Introducing Solides

Signs your baby is ready for solids!

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  • Hold their head up on their own

  • Sit up in a high chair

  • Open their mouth open WIDE when offered a spoon

  • Turn their face away if they don’t want food

  • Close their lips over the spoon

  • Keep food in their mouth and swallow instead of pushing it out

Usually, babies are ready to start solids at 6 months old

  • Solids provide the extra iron and nutrition that babies need for healthy growth and development

  • But don’t forget… Breast milk is still important!

What are hunger cues?

  • Open mouth when offered food on a spoon

  • Putting hands in mouth

  • Shows interest in eating

  • Leans forward towards food/spoon

What are fullness cues?

  • Pushes spoon with food away

  • Keeps mouth closed and/or turns head away

  • Seems upset or disinterested

  • Spits food out

What foods should be introduced?

  • Introduce foods that are rich in iron

  • These include: infant cereals, beef, chicken, turkey, eggs, beans, lentils and chickpeas

  • Offer iron rich foods two or more times per day

Allergies

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  • Foods that caused allergic reactions like peanuts, eggs, or milk products can be introduced at 6 months

  • If you are introducing a food that is a “common” allergy, avoid offering more than one per day

  • Also, wait two days before introducing another food

  • This makes it easier to identify which food causes the reaction

Textures

  • Introduce a variety of soft textures – this can be lumpy, minced, pureed, mashed, or ground

  • Offer finger foods such as soft ripe fruit or grated cheese to encourage your child to feed themselves!

  • Introduce different textures sooner than later – delaying the introduction or lumpy textures beyond nine months can cause feeding difficulties when your baby gets older

References

City of Toronto. (2018). Feeding your Child. Retrieved from https://www.toronto.ca/community-people/children-parenting/pregnancy-and-parenting/parenting/feeding-your-child/

Government of Canada. (2018). How Much Food You Need Every Day. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/canada-food-guide/food-guide-basics/much-food-you-need-every-day.html